Search

D. A. Boxill

Dream | Aspire | Believe

Category

Prose

The 50 Best Independent Fiction and Poetry Books of 2014


Flavorwire

2014 will go down as a landmark year in independent literature, chiefly because a few longstanding “trends” or “developments” are hardening into verifiable traits of fiction and poetry beyond Big Publishing. To begin with, independent poetry, noted especially here in the works of Claudia Rankine and Andrew Durbin, is becoming more sophisticated in the way it encroaches upon other forms of visual and literary art. Elsewhere, in fiction, a greater tendency toward autofictional novels of emotional maturation — typically in a cruel world — is colliding with the arriving generation’s faith in the bending of genres. The increasing confidence these writers have in their forms is beginning to show in the way they assert themselves against an older generation, sure, but it’s also showing up in the quality of the books. Plainly put: line for line, stanza for stanza, independent writing, and therefore independent publishing, is better than it was just a…

View original post 2,881 more words

Discovering Caribbean Literature in English: A Select Bibliography (UPDATED)

We Can’t Get Lost Anymore


Thought Catalog

We can’t jump off bridges anymore because our iPhones will get ruined. We can’t take skinny dips in the ocean, because there’s no service on the beach and adventures aren’t real unless they’re on Instagram. Technology has doomed the spontaneity of adventure and we’re helping destroy it every time we Google, check-in, and hashtag.

My best friend and I once got lost in Connecticut. We were juniors in high school, it was 2004, and we were lost in the state we’d grown up in together. We kept driving, hopeless and amused, using the signs on the road and our spotty intuition as our guides. We sang songs in the car as our cell phones, incapable of no more than a phone call, sat like bricks in our pockets. There wasn’t a map of the world conveniently in the palm of our hands, no app to see how many people had…

View original post 798 more words

book of december: james potter


Enjoy Not Knowing

Happy New Year’s folks!

As promised, the last book of the month of this year. 2012 has been full of good books, and fun reads. To wrap up 2012 I leave you not with one book of December, but rather an author of December. This month I may have had more reading time. (I get of work an hour and a half before Evelina comes home = reading time.) And therefore I have read more books.

I’ll preface this with letting you know I’ve never read fan fiction before. I loved the Harry Potter books, as many around the world have. G. Norman Lippert has written 3 fan fiction books based on the Harry Potter world that follow Harry’s son, James, as he goes through his school years at Hogwarts. He has also written his own original works and one short story about characters he created in the James Potter…

View original post 266 more words

NaNoWriMo – Embrace the Icky Sticky!


Dave Farmer

Whether you’re a seasoned writer or a NoWriMo virgin, sooner or later you’ll probably reach a point I call The Lifeless River Bed of Despondency and Meh. This is where the initial adrenaline rush has driven your Storymobile across the rich and vivid fictional landscape only to find it splutter and grind to a halt. Why does this happen?

There are many reasons, for example:

  • Your characters may have reached a dead-end.
  • Your plot that started out so well is suddenly too big and cumbersome, or you’ve realised it has less substance than you thought.
  • There are so many sub plots they’re eating each other alive and your story & characters are suffering.
  • Perhaps you’ve reached the end ahead of time, or realise that the end is still so far in the distance it’s like a mirage you’ll never reach.

It’s at this point you’re likely to panic.

But that’s…

View original post 2,002 more words

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑