Search

D. A. Boxill

Dream | Aspire | Believe

Tag

Blessing

Femme Fatale


Femme Fatale is a collaboration between photographer Amleya Clarke, make-up artist Alpheus Lythcott and photographer Shawn Fields. It is a Barbadian fashion and beauty photo series much like an amalgamation of a lookbook, fashion zine and portfolio. We’re proud to feature young, local, talented and up-and-coming designers and diverse models who all share our passion for style, creativity and celebrating the beauty of our Caribbean women through our work.

Femme Fatale is about the beauty, strength, mystique and character of Caribbean women. These photo editorials include story-driven narratives such as Search for Paradise and Points Beyond; creative concepts such as the Fierceronette, and modern and classic takes such as in Into the Light and Soirees D’ete. We also have a special spread with Ebony Kellman of Make-up Doll Cosmetics, a local make-up line whose products have been used in some of the shoots.

Advertisements
Featured post

25 Things You Don’t Have To Justify To Anyone

Why I Have Faith

Apologies – Accident – Greetings and Update


I know I promised to post some stuff and I’ve been gone a long time but unfortunately a vehicle ran through my house causing major damage. This was in October right after my birthday and the insurance companies have yet to finalise payments so repairs and replacement of equipment can begin. So I’ve been kinda out of it and displaced for a while  but I shall be back with you again through the holiday season into the New Year.

Vehicle Damaged my house
Vehicle Damaged my house

 

Thanks for staying with me and thanks for your patience!

Sincerely,

D A Boxill.

 

Chase your dreams. Believe in them


 

The Summer Olympics and Paralympics! How can we forget that glorious spectacle, the culmination of years of training, sweat, tears and sacrifice for thousands of athletes, families, trainers, coaches and many others.

 

All of the athletes were gold medal hopefuls intending to compete their hardest and do their best for personal and national glory. That was their rainbow.

 

Some say chasing rainbows is a hopeless pursuit that can never be fulfilled. But I like to believe that for some even chasing rainbows is enough. What your personal rainbow is and why you are chasing it is important to you. Sadly, I find some people are not willing to respect that.

 

Too often, others are overly negative and harshly critical because they can’t see your goal; they can’t believe in your journey towards a personal rainbow’s end. There might even be those who support us in the beginning but tire of our journey and falter or drop out along the way. Many of us might even have been forced to go on our own from the start.

 

At the end of the day, I think we’re all just chasing rainbows; searching for that bit of happiness, magic and colour that makes life seem worthwhile. I think we’re all just waiting out the storm hoping that after the showers and hardships, we will be greeted with that bit of brilliance.

 

Some of us may hide from the storms, afraid of the thunder and lightning. Personally, I love storms. I love the rumble of the sky drums in concert and the flashes of “God’s X-ray” passing through us all. I love the feel of rain and wind sweeping me. But storms can’t last forever no matter the damage they cause or how big they are. Survival of a storm means lessons should have been learnt, knowledge and wisdom should have been gained and what has been proven to be weak should be strengthened and improved.

 

I ask you, what is your current storm? What is making life difficult for you? Can you change it? If you can’t change your circumstances, can you change yourself in such a way that you can live more easily in your circumstances?

 

What is your current rainbow? What are your dreams and why are you pursuing them? What is your hope for the future? Do you believe in your rainbow enough to get through the storms? Can you believe in it?

 

Chase your dreams. Believe in them. Find your happiness.

 

At the end of the day, we’re all just chasing rainbows.

 

Blessings


 

By Daniel Boxill

Blessings are wonderful. Some believe them to be acts of providence or simply luck. Whatever the belief, blessings usually indicate a positive change in fortunes for a person.  One would expect therefore, that when I received my blessings one beautiful afternoon, that I would have been pleased.

However in Bajan (Barbadian dialect) “to get blessed” refers to the act of being defecated upon by a bird. The warm, green and white blessing decorated my arm, pants, guitar case and Coke bottle, complementing my favourite green shirt. At that point, it just seemed like the crowning moment of an extremely frustrating day.

Hours later however, in the safety of my home (and after a good scrub down), I reflected on my blessing.

Life is full of these blessings. They come in all kinds of flavours but one thing they have in common is that they are seldom truly appreciated at the moment they arrive. They arrive unexpectedly and often cause emotional distress, higher heart rates and blood pressures and retaliation in the form of well-aimed shots of expletives.

But we all need these blessings. For example, they fertilise the earth and many plants depend on them for spreading their seeds. Contained in this waste matter is a hope for new life for, hope for a future, hope in the most unlikely of places.

Hope is something most of us definitely need in these uncertain and challenging times. As unemployment figures continue to rise and even the most optimistic of economists predicts very little improvement in the immediate future, hope is all some have left. Many people don’t even have that much.

The economic fiasco the world has faced has cost too many people their jobs, houses, relationships and all of their material possessions. Even those who’ve managed to keep a job are often doing so with reduced hours and are barely hanging on to what they have. Even so, material possessions mean very little when you can’t eat.

I believe we are all blessed no matter our situation or how little we have. I also believe we are more blessed by blessing others. Be charitable and help others out in whatever way you can. If you can’t afford to give financially, donate yourself and your time. Sharing and being there for others will go a long way and be a lot more beneficial to persons than waiting for our governments to wade through their bureaucracy and political tribalism to sort out the economy. Solutions should always begin with oneself. Waiting on others and expecting them to solve our problems may leave us forever waiting.

I was ready to give up, waiting on others to solve my problems for me. This blessing reminded me I have the power to change my fate and that I truly am blessed.

If I ever meet the bird again, I’ll be sure to thank him but I’ll make sure I have an umbrella this time.

(Originally published: http://www.yourcommonwealth.org/americas-and-caribbean/blessings-arrive-unexpectedly-and-often-cause-emotional-distress )

About Author: Daniel Boxill is a freelance multi-media artist. With a passion for music, literary talent and a background in art and design, multi-media artist is an apt title. He is freelancing while currently pursuing his undergrad degree in Literatures in English from The University of the West Indies‘, Cave Hill Campus located in his native Barbados.

 

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑