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D. A. Boxill

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The Topics Dystopian Films Won’t Touch – Entertainment – The Atlantic


By Imran Siddiquee

Since the release of The Hunger Games in 2012, dystopian cinema has enjoyed sustained interest in American culture. Popular young adult novels are being turned into blockbuster Hollywood films every few months, it seems, and with good reason: Beyond their built-in teen fan base, films like Divergent,The Giver, and The Maze Runner draw on some of adult society’s greatest fears of the moment: Is technology tearing us further apart? Will global warming destroy the planet? Will income inequality further create a world of haves and have-nots?

Critics have worried that these particular films stoke an irrational fear of technology, or a distaste for big government, but dystopian stories have long been celebrated (and used in classrooms across the country) because of their ability to push audiences to think critically about their actions.

Yet with the upcoming release of The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1, poised to be the biggest film of the year, it’s just as worthwhile to consider what these films don’t seem to fear. While recent dystopias warn youth about over-reliance on computers, totalitarian rule, class warfare, pandemic panics and global warming, very few ask audiences to think deeply about sexism and racism.

Which is strange. If the United States were to truly transform into a totalitarian state, or suffer an environmental catastrophe, it’s safe to say society’s deepest divisions wouldn’t magically disappear overnight. These dystopian adaptations ask their young audiences to imagine that race and gender issues have been partially overcome in the future, while general human suffering has somehow increased. The results feel false, and undercut the films’ attempts to comment on the present day.

This is not to say that these movies don’t occasionally touch upon identity—both Divergent and The Hunger Games clearly have something to say about gender equity, and The Maze Runner gives boys of color some prominent roles. But none imagines a future in which racism and sexism are significant problems facing their protagonists.

For instance, in The Hunger Games films, there is diversity in the cast. District 11, the site of a brutal execution in the second film, is filled almost entirely with black inhabitants. But at the same time, the film implies that white characters like Katniss and Gale now make up the majority of the poorest district (12).

None of the primary characters seems affected by race or are racist. Instead, the film continues the old sci-fi tradition of imagining the subjugation of white people, essentially saying, “Things could get so bad that people who look like Liam Hemsworth are now at the bottom, too!”

Whenever Hollywood does get an opportunity to talk about race in one of these movies, it minimizes the subject. Characters of color like Beetee, Cinna (Lenny Kravitz), who mentored Katniss, or Christina, Tris’s best friend in Divergent (played by Kravitz’s daughter Zoe), certainly play major roles in these stories, but their race is never at issue. You might say that this is an example of admirably “colorblind” filmmaking—were it not for the fact that the audience’s perspective is always that of a white protagonist.

To an extent, the diversity of characters depends on the source material, but producers typically have some leeway in casting decisions. Suzanne Collins, in her original novel, does not explicitly describe Katniss as Anglo-Saxon (she has “olive skin”), so it’s actually the filmmakers who make the decision to default to white. In fact, Collins intentionally leaves many lead characters in the novels racially ambiguous, creating a more integrated and nuanced world.

When the first Hunger Games film decided to cast black actors in the roles of Cinna and Rue, many fans of Collins’s book (who had imagined the characters differently despite the novel’s clear description of their “dark brown” skin color) were upset, but they still went to see the film in droves. In the sequel, Jeffrey Wright was cast as Beetee, who is in fact described as having “ashen” skin by Collins.

Similarly, the recent film adaptation of The Giver, based on Lois Lowry’s beloved dystopian young adult novel, hinges on the concept of “sameness,” as it imagines a future in which those in power have decided to erase the collective memory of humanity and “protect” people from their own emotions. The result is the creation of a bland and literally colorless community (the first section of the film is presented entirely in black and white). Yet rather than using this opportunity in part to further explore how “color” operates in the real world (namely, how race relates to power), the filmmakers barely touch the subject at all, in essence promoting the very “sameness” that Lowry feared.

It seems like at some point, Hollywood would get around to telling a different kind of story. There are more than a few alternative YA dystopian books for Hollywood to pick from—including epics like Octavia Butler’s novel Parable of the Sower, which explores social and environmental devastation from a more intersectional perspective. Parable of the Sower focuses on the life of 15-year-old Lauren Olamina as she tries to survive in a country devastated by global warming and poverty.

Her primary foe is a rapidly declining society, but like in Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, Lauren is also up against increasingly patriarchal institutions. In a world where corporations begin to own entire cities, it’s harder for people of color to find safe housing and jobs are especially scarce for women. While marriage itself offers few real benefits anymore, interracial marriage is still a potentially dangerous choice for some characters.

Butler simultaneously confronts a myriad of oppressions and portrays her black protagonist’s success as not only the result of determination, intelligence and bravery—but also her “hyperempathy” for others and an intense belief in the concept of “change.” As Lauren says in the novel:

Embrace diversity. Unite—or be divided, robbed, ruled, killed by those who see you as prey. Embrace diversity, or be destroyed.

This is how Butler weaves a variety of issues into her narrative, without zeroing in explicitly on any one of them. And though “hyperempathy” may seem a heavy concept, consider that the current crop of blockbusters do not hesitate to show kids killing one another in the name of capitalism, violently thwarting monsters to escape the maze of adolescence, and even murdering babies.

It seems then that youth could benefit from a more honest investigation of what a world of increased oppression might really look like, or at least a more resonant reflection of the world in which they already live.

This article available online at:
http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2014/11/the-topics-dystopian-films-wont-touch/382509/

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25 Things You Don’t Have To Justify To Anyone

Born to Die by Daniel Boxill


…and sorrows run down your face,
onto my shoulder,
into my heart.
I share your pain as we embrace

Crimson stains spread,
dyeing my love with increasing fear.
Regrets drip from the handle bridging our abdomens.
The blade buried in you deeper than my love could heal.
Gladiator games we played, distractions;
an empire crumbled, burned,
as we fought ourselves.
Drunken orgies of flesh and glass;
Cocaine showers, toxic habits became routine.

cycles…

tears, shampoo showers,

soap suds sex, tears ,

slap, scratch, scream, tears…

cycles…

…and we knelt at a burning altar.
We snorted our vows.
Powdered pledges
We wed in elevated bliss, smoky rings of Mary Jane exchanged.

Red and blue flashes;
Sirens pierce the silent summer heat.
Curious eyes and gossiping tongues are drawn into the street.
Our burning passions set fire to fragile suburban utopia.
Lost souls prostituted to addiction in search of happiness;
Minds possessed by paranoia,
You became the demon I tried to fight
And I think I became yours.
Cocaine showers help toxic seeds to bloom.

cycles…

tears, demonic highs,

possession and visions, tears ,

slam, slap, scream, tears…

cycles…

…and I cut my wrists
You die. I die
You are my life!
I clutch your body to mine as everything around us burns.

You and I,
We were born to die.

 

© Daniel Boxill 2012. All rights reserved.

A risk that women will forever be Atlases


By Daniel Boxill

As the pillar of support for the family unit, which functions as the foundation of society, women provide social cohesion and are the backbone of any strong community.

They make up half of the world’s population and comprise over one billion Commonwealth citizens. Yet, the value of women in society seems to never truly be appreciated.

Women themselves often seem to be unaware of the power they hold, allowing themselves to constantly be downtrodden, while maintaining their silent fight just to survive inhuman conditions.

War especially highlights this. During armed conflicts, invading forces often rape, beat and mutilate women. The women are treated as nothing more than objects and they often go willingly, sacrificing themselves to protect their children and families.

This is the true double-edged beauty of a woman. Strong enough to bear the emotional burdens of the world, but all too often called upon to sacrifice themselves for others.

In Greek mythology, Atlas was forced during the Titanomachy (The war of Gods vs Titans) to forever bear the burden of the sky on his back. So too does the fate of women seem.

There is a risk that women will forever be Atlases. Although in most of our societies, patriarchy is deeply ingrained and everything seems geared towards the advancement of men over women, women are the ones who in fact hold power.

I would argue:

  • Women control most societies’ economic power. They are the ones who control the spending in most households.
  • Usually left to take care of children, women are the ones who are responsible for training each new generation and what is indoctrinated into them in their early life. They therefore heavily influence belief systems.
  • Men are enamoured by women and will do most anything to win them over and to impress them.

Unless women lobby and agitate for change, several things to which they’re subjected will continue to be taken for granted as acceptable. Women need to grab hold of the power which they own and use it to improve their lives.

There must be a balance however. Simply replacing men in power with women will solve nothing. It will simply create a role reversal where men then feel inferior and then have to fight for power creating a cyclic gender war.

The aim should be power-sharing, where women are allowed to have power along with men, with both groups being empowered, motivated and feeling like worthwhile members of society.

(Originally published: http://www.yourcommonwealth.org/americas-and-caribbean/correspondence-there-is-a-risk-that-women-will-forever-be-atlases/ )

About Author: Daniel Boxill is a freelance multi-media artist. With a passion for music, literary talent and a background in art and design, multi-media artist is an apt title. He is freelancing while currently pursuing his undergrad degree in Literatures in English from The University of the West Indies’, Cave Hill Campus located in his native Barbados.

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