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D. A. Boxill

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Writing

Discovering Caribbean Literature in English: A Select Bibliography (UPDATED)

We Can’t Get Lost Anymore


Thought Catalog

We can’t jump off bridges anymore because our iPhones will get ruined. We can’t take skinny dips in the ocean, because there’s no service on the beach and adventures aren’t real unless they’re on Instagram. Technology has doomed the spontaneity of adventure and we’re helping destroy it every time we Google, check-in, and hashtag.

My best friend and I once got lost in Connecticut. We were juniors in high school, it was 2004, and we were lost in the state we’d grown up in together. We kept driving, hopeless and amused, using the signs on the road and our spotty intuition as our guides. We sang songs in the car as our cell phones, incapable of no more than a phone call, sat like bricks in our pockets. There wasn’t a map of the world conveniently in the palm of our hands, no app to see how many people had…

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NaNoWriMo – Embrace the Icky Sticky!


Dave Farmer

Whether you’re a seasoned writer or a NoWriMo virgin, sooner or later you’ll probably reach a point I call The Lifeless River Bed of Despondency and Meh. This is where the initial adrenaline rush has driven your Storymobile across the rich and vivid fictional landscape only to find it splutter and grind to a halt. Why does this happen?

There are many reasons, for example:

  • Your characters may have reached a dead-end.
  • Your plot that started out so well is suddenly too big and cumbersome, or you’ve realised it has less substance than you thought.
  • There are so many sub plots they’re eating each other alive and your story & characters are suffering.
  • Perhaps you’ve reached the end ahead of time, or realise that the end is still so far in the distance it’s like a mirage you’ll never reach.

It’s at this point you’re likely to panic.

But that’s…

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Born to Die by Daniel Boxill


…and sorrows run down your face,
onto my shoulder,
into my heart.
I share your pain as we embrace

Crimson stains spread,
dyeing my love with increasing fear.
Regrets drip from the handle bridging our abdomens.
The blade buried in you deeper than my love could heal.
Gladiator games we played, distractions;
an empire crumbled, burned,
as we fought ourselves.
Drunken orgies of flesh and glass;
Cocaine showers, toxic habits became routine.

cycles…

tears, shampoo showers,

soap suds sex, tears ,

slap, scratch, scream, tears…

cycles…

…and we knelt at a burning altar.
We snorted our vows.
Powdered pledges
We wed in elevated bliss, smoky rings of Mary Jane exchanged.

Red and blue flashes;
Sirens pierce the silent summer heat.
Curious eyes and gossiping tongues are drawn into the street.
Our burning passions set fire to fragile suburban utopia.
Lost souls prostituted to addiction in search of happiness;
Minds possessed by paranoia,
You became the demon I tried to fight
And I think I became yours.
Cocaine showers help toxic seeds to bloom.

cycles…

tears, demonic highs,

possession and visions, tears ,

slam, slap, scream, tears…

cycles…

…and I cut my wrists
You die. I die
You are my life!
I clutch your body to mine as everything around us burns.

You and I,
We were born to die.

 

© Daniel Boxill 2012. All rights reserved.

Orson Welles’ Rules of Writing.


Orson Welles, 1951.

We’ve had Kurt Vonnegut’s rules of writing and Stephen King’s. I want to share with you familiar advice by one of the greater creative minds of the 20th century. Welles’ talents did not stop at writing. He ended up directing and acting in many great film classics. Needless to say a man his talent could give some invaluable advice. And he did! In 1946 he released an essay called: ‘Politics and the English Language”. In this he defines 6 rules of writing. 6 rules he thinks writers should by. Give them a read.

  1. Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print.
  2. Never use a long word where a short one will do.
  3. If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out.
  4. Never use the passive where you can use the active.
  5. Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent.
  6. Break any of these rules sooner than say anything outright barbarous.

 
– via Sander

Kurt Vonnegut’s rules of writing.

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